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What is the Difference between Supplemental Security Income (SSI) and Social Security Disability Income (SSDI) benefits?

The SSI and SSDI disability programs offer benefits for disabled or blind people. However, the financial eligibility requirements are different. The main difference between Social Security Disability (SSDI) and Supplemental Security Income (SSI) is the fact that SSDI is available to workers who have accumulated a sufficient number of work credits. SSI disability benefits are only available to low-income individuals who have either never worked or who haven’t earned enough work credits to qualify for SSDI.

SSI (Supplemental Security Income) and SSDI (Social Security Disability Insurance) are two completely different governmental programs. However, they are both managed under the Social Security Administration umbrella. Medical eligibility for disability is determined in the same manner for both programs.

What Is SSI (Supplemental Security Income)?
Supplemental Security Income is a program that is strictly need-based, according to income and assets, and is funded by general tax funding (not from the Social Security trust fund). SSI has nothing to do with work history, it is based strictly on financial need. To meet the SSI income requirements, you must have less than $2,000 in assets (or $3,000 for a couple) and a very limited income.

Disabled people who are eligible under the income requirements for SSI are also able to receive Medicaid in the state they live in. People who qualify for SSI are also usually qualified for food stamps, and the amount an eligible person will receive is dependent on where they live and the amount of regular, monthly income they have. SSI benefits begin on the first of the month when you first submit your application.

What Is SSDI (Social Security Disability Insurance)?
Social Security Disability Insurance is funded through our payroll taxes. SSDI recipients are considered “insured” because they have worked for a certain number of years and have made contributions to the Social Security trust fund in the form of FICA Social Security taxes. SSDI candidates must be younger than 65 and have earned a certain number of work credits. credits After receiving SSDI for two years, a disabled person will become eligible for Medicare. Under SSDI, a disabled person’s spouse and children dependents are eligible to receive partial dependent benefits. However, only adults over the age of 18 can receive the SSDI disability benefit.

There is a five-month waiting period for benefits, you must wait five months after you become disabled. The amount of the monthly benefit after the waiting period is over depends on your earnings record, much like the Social Security retirement benefit. Approval rates for SSDI are higher on average than they are for SSI. most SSI applicants don’t have.

Source: https://www.webwire.com/ViewPressRel.asp?aId=226719

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